Animals of the world, Brown Bear

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Brunbjørn (640x485)

  • Native to Europe, Asia, and northwestern North America
  • brown bears generally seems to prefer partly open country, with a scattering of vegetation that can allow them a resting spot during the day. However, they have been recorded as inhabiting every variety of northern temperate forest known to occur.
  • Coat colour is highly variable, ranging from greyish white through bluish and brownish shades to almost black
  • Brown bears can be recognized by their most distinctive feature, their shoulder hump.  Super strong shoulder muscles help this bear to dig up roots and tear apart logs to find food
  • Brown bears have very large and curved claws, those present on the forelimbs being longer than those on the hind limbs
  • They are very mobile and have been known to travel long distances to food sources.
  • Brown bears are omnivorous and feed on berries, plant roots and shoots, small mammals, fish, calves of many hoofed animals, and carrion
  • Brown bears usually forage in the morning and evening and rest under dense vegetation during the day
  • In summer through autumn, a brown bear can double its weight from the spring, gaining up to 180 kg (400 lb) of fat, on which it relies to make it through winter, when it becomes very lethargic
  • Brown bears are not highly territorial. Several adult bears often roam freely over the same vicinity without issue unless rights to a fertile female or food sources are being contested
  • Except in some southern areas, bears retire to dens in winter. Hibernation dens may consist of any spot that provides cover from the elements and that can accommodate their bodies, such as a cave, crevice, cavernous tree roots, or hollow logs
  • Despite their enormous size, brown bears have been clocked at speeds of 48 km/t (30 miles per hour)
  • In the wild, the brown bears can reach 20 to 30 years of age

 

References; Nationalgeographic.com, Wikipedia, Britannica.com, BBC.com, Australiangeographic.com, Birdlife.org.au,worldwildlife.com

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